Alicia Online: Step-by-step guide on how to run it on Windows 7 Professional / Windows 7 Home using Vistalizator
 

Alicia Online: Step-by-step guide on how to run it on Windows 7 Professional / Windows 7 Home using Vistalizator

 
Cat Cosplay Made Out of Grapefruit – There are more pics than everyone thought!
 

Cat Cosplay Made Out of Grapefruit – There are more pics than everyone thought!

 
Best Cat Cosplay Ever!
 

Best Cat Cosplay Ever!

 

Vanguard. Saga Of Heroes: The Famous Fail Beginning And End – Part 2

Vanguard. Saga Of Heroes: The Famous Fail Beginning And End This is Part 2 of the story of Vanguard: Saga of Heroes. A story of the fail that really was famous in it’s days, the story of a game that was pretty much fail at the beginning of its life – but got fixed, patched and in time became a real gem that would shine if this game was released, say, last or this year – but not many people know about it. Because if you fail once, it’s almost impossible to avert the damage (and Square Enix is learning this lesson now too, i bet). So, we all heard it was a big fail, right? But how and why did it happened in the first place? And why now I’m calling this game “a gem” when you probably heard no one plays it now?

If you haven’t read the previous post, check it out here:
Vanguard. Saga Of Heroes: The Famous Fail Beginning And End – Part 1

…One more serious mistake has been made. As i said before, the game engine they choose to use wasn’t meant for MMOs back then, and it was heavily tweaked – which, of course, did not add more stability or make it less resource-hungry. Vanguard’s world was giant and seamless – you could see things miles away, and the graphics were outstanding by the time. So what did this mean? Low stability and insane system requirements. Why wasn’t it optimized, you’d ask? Well, partly probably because they couldn’t do that, and partly because the management fails again.

When McQuaid worked on EverQuest, it was running on Voodoo video cards, which was an “insane system requirement” back then, because video cards were just presented to the player audience and only a small amount of people had them. But people were ready to buy them – to upgrade their computers only to play EverQuest. McQuaid expected audience to do the same for Vanguard. He missed the point that EverQuest wasn’t a rule set in stone, it was released after Ultima Online, when player base was mostly hardcore and geek, and there weren’t many online games out (especially, online games made in 3D). So EverQuest was just the right game for just the right time. When Vanguard came off, the audience was more casual, there were plenty of games to play and no one bothered to buy anything for the bugged monstrosity they saw at the first look.

When beta-testing phase came…
…now, hold your jaw before you read next, i mean it…
…here i cite that ex-Sigil employee interview i mentioned before:

f13.net: How was QA treated through the course of development?
Ex-Sigil: QA?
f13.net: QA.
Ex-Sigil: QA was one person up until about November… ONE.
f13.net: What.
Ex-Sigil: Vanguard had one internal tester for probably 95% of the design cycle. Ex-Sigil: 100% serious.
f13.net: What? How? This is an MMOG.
Ex-Sigil: Vanguard had one internal tester for probably 95% of the design cycle.

So if you play a game and have a feeling that no one ever tested it and the devs didn’t even played it themselves, that could be 100% true, Sigil totally proves that.

During the beta stage McQuaid and Butler disappeared. Literally. At first, McQuaid played the beta, but then he stopped and was just writing on Sigil’s forums, but then he stopped doing even that, and Butler went out even earlier. Probably they saw the inevitable crash that was coming and couldn’t face it – or who knows, why they did that – but they just retired to somewhere, stopped making decisions and went out of contact. It was right before the release, and other managers who were left alone were of course aware of the eventual failure just waiting to happen and were so scared of making an even more wrong decision that they weren’t making any at all. Development team then lost its decision-making center, programmers, designers and artists were working overtimes in hell (like 18 hours a day, according to ex-Sigil employee), but they were on their own – there wasn’t anyone to take lead of the team.

And then the release date came.

Vanguard. Saga of Heroes: The famous fail beginning and endOn January 30, 2007 Vanguard: Saga of Heroes was co-published by Sigil and Sony Online Entertainment.
On May 15, 2007 SOE announced that it had acquired Sigil’s “key assets” and thus now owns Vanguard. One afternoon prior to that the staff of Sigil were told by email to gather the stuff they would need for the evening (like keys and wallets) and to meet in the parking lot. There they heard “you’re all fired” from Andy Platter, who was Director of Production. Dave Gilbertson, who was currently in charge (being VP) was there, but had not said a single word, and Brad McQuaid or Jeff Buttler, the founders of Sigil Games Online, weren’t even there. So whole Sigil team was kicked out in a blink of an eye. Some of them were hired back by SOE (something around 50 employees), but most had to look for a new job.

Ex-Sigil: Well, worst of all.. at the end of Sigil, Brad wasn’t even there to look us in the eye and apologize.

The beginning of this post is here:
Vanguard. Saga Of Heroes: The Famous Fail Beginning And End – Part 1
There is another part that will finish the post series and i will post a link to it here as soon as it’s online.

Wordpress website enhanced by true google 404